About me

I am a psychiatrist with additional experience and training in epidemiology and public health. My knowledge of evolutionary psychology keeps me wondering about how our history impacts on the way men behave today. 

 

My real education started at the High School of Music and Art, where I was a violin major; until Covid-19 I played chamber music with friends every week. Next, I did premedical studies at the City College of New York (CCNY), got my MD at New York University, and my Masters in Public Health and Epidemiology at Columbia University. 

 

I’ve had teaching positions at several medical schools, including New York University, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, and Harvard. For many years I was the Chief Psychiatric Consultant for the American Psychiatric Association.The American Orthopsychiatric Association  elected me to serve a term as President. 

I founded and served as Executive Director of The Information Exchange, a national non-profit organization.  For 16 years we published a newsletter, called Tie–Lines, about co-occurring mental health and drug use/abuse disorders. I did day-long training workshops for about 120,000 professionals, family members, and clients.  The workshops covered the United States, Canada and Europe.The focus was on the need to integrate mental health and substance abuse treatment for individuals with both a mental health and a substance abuse disorder.When that task was substantially completed I sunsetted the agency: Mission Mostly Accomplished.

 

The two years I spent as a staff physician in a federal prison/hospital were focused on treating drug addicts. That's when I got deeply interested in the effects of trauma on men's lives. I’ve devoted much of my career to working with homeless, addicted, and traumatized people, as a consultant and as a volunteer.

 

During the four decades of my psychiatric career, whatever job I had, I always had a small private practice so that I could stay in touch with the issues of people's daily lives. My practice has been broad and general, with a special focus on helping women and men recover from trauma. 

 

Around 1993 I found that I was doing trauma recovery work with eight men, each in individual therapy. I invited them to meet me for a class about recovering from trauma. We set up 12 Monday evening meetings from 8 to 10 PM every other week. Twenty-seven years later this men’s group was still meeting on the same schedule, every other Monday from 8 to 10 PM. When Covid-19 struck and quarantine became necessary, the group switched to a Zoom meeting every Monday evening, for one hour, and I have rejoined the group.

 

I'd like to thank the men of the group for helping me realize and understand things that bothered me all my life. What I learned from this extensive process became the inspiration for this website. I am also trying to publish a book that investigates how and why hierarchy  plays such a powerful role in the lives of boys and men.